Tag Archives: University of Nevada

Emmys Honor Las Vegas Entertainers

Although the Emmy awards tomorrow won’t involve Las Vegas nominees for the CBS prime-time ceremonies, they were included in the prior Creative Arts ceremonies on Sept. 12 in Los Angeles.  Las Vegas Backstage Access takes time out to honor their contributions. 

PennandTeller2Emmy nominations honored Rio headliners Penn & Teller, left, and stage designer Andy Walmsley,Andy Walmsley right. Penn Jillette and Teller — along with writer Michael Goudeau, who also performs with Lance Burton — were nominated for Outstanding Writing for Nonfiction Programming for their Showtime series “Bullshit!” The “New Age Medicine” episode was singled out in the series that devotes each half-hour to debunking its selected topic.  

The series also was nominated for its editing, though Jillette and Teller were not personally nominated in that category. The series has been nominated 13 times previously, five for writing and four for overall nods in the reality category. In its seventh season, it is Showtime’s longest-running series. 

Walmsley’s set for “American Idol” was nominated for Outstanding Art Direction for Variety, Music Or Nonfiction Programming. 

The British set designer moved to Las Vegas four years ago and his recent work includes the sets for Mirage headliner Terry Fator and Flamingo magician Nathan Burton. It’s his third Emmy nomination (same category, all for “Idol”). 

Walmsley also is launching a Web site for Las Vegas entertainment professionals: www.vegasliveshowpro.com.

 Although not Las Vegas-based, David Rockwell — the ubiquitous designer who created the sets for “Peepshow,” the custom theater for “Phantom” and retail-restaurant space at CityCenter — is competing against Walmsley. Rockwell is nominated for his stage design for the Academy Awards.

Los Angeles-based choreographers Napoleon and Tabitha D’Umo, both graduates of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, were also nominated for Outstanding Choreography for “So You Think You Can Dance,” as was Mia Michaels, who chroeographed Celine Dion’s “A New Day.”

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Britney Spears’ Camp Slams Las Vegas College Kid

It’s never a dull day in ol’ Britneyland– always a circus, concert tour or not.

Jordan Miller, right, a 21-year-old University of Nevada, Las Vegas college student majoring in communicationsJordanMiller launched his breatheheavy.com Web site all about the pop star, literally out of a labor of love and admiration for the star, from his Summerlin, Nevada bedroom while being in high school in 2004. 

Now, his Web site gets a half-million visits a day. 

JamieSpearsMiller’s world started to turn upside down-last fall after he received an angry phone call from the Britney’s dad, Jamie Spears, left, accusing him of copyright infringement.

Miller is fighting back.  “I’m working my ass off to report on this girl,” Miller said from his attorney’s office.  “I just think [Britney] is a really cool artist; I feel inspired by her. It’s a healthy hobby.  It takes a lot of work and dedication, but it’s self-fulfilling.” 

Miller said father Jamie Spears replied, telling him:  “I am going to destroy your ass.” 

“I was really freaking out for a good three, four weeks,” Miller said, adding,  “Lately, I’ve been doing my own thing.  I just kind of want to keep going.” 

Each day, Miller scans the Internet for stories about Britney Spears, posting them on his Webs Site and adds his comments.  He also encourages her fans to send him concert photos and messages about her worldwide “Circus” tour.

Henderson, Nevada attorney Clarke Walton, who represents Miller pro bono, has been battling the Spears legal team tooth and nail. 

Spears’ New-York based attorney Brad Rose says the use of the star’s recordings, images, copyrighted works and trademarks constitutes actionable infringement under the law. 

Miller and Walton are puzzled that Team Spears would leave oodles of other fan sites alone and yet see fit to sic legal hounds on a kid who is simply a huge admirer of the singer.  Miller believes Jamie Spears is “trying to shut me down” simply because of Web site posted comments about the father’s control over his daughter.  Miller believe Jamie is keeping Britney a prisoner. 

And it’s not like Miller has an Internet goldmine- Miller pays $300 a month to keep the site going and receives an average of $100 each month from advertisers.  Miller is also not using images or lyrics for commercial purposes, like selling merchandise. 

“If they want to fight, I’d love this fight,” Walton said. “I feel confident we would win on the merits of this case.”

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Las Vegas Mob’s ‘Cement Shoes’ Now Concrete Canoes?

The mob has been doing much less ‘planting’ nowadays.  And with the many stalled and failed casino construction projects dotting the Las Vegas landscape brought on by an ever constricting economy, it’s no secret that Las Vegas has a ton – maybe two? – of ready and willing concrete at its disposal. 

Grabbing this weighty waste opportunity, UNLV engineering students have built and are planning to race a buoyant unlvcanoeconcrete canoe in the fiercely competitive 2009 National ASCE Concrete Canoe Competition in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on June 11-13.

But first they must clear the regional competition hurdle, finishing in the top five in competitions set from April 1 through 4 in Hawaii. About 20 teams are competing. 

To win it will take equal parts of technical skill, creativity and determination. 

Created from a year’s worth of blood, sweat, and tears, the slippery smooth, svelte 250-pound black, blue, and white canoe with a UNLV mosaic on the bottom, and the name Kiss Our Glass on the side, was engineered to be a precise 20 feet long and 30 inches wide. It has to be made that precise.  That’s the rules. 

The races, endurance, sprint, and slalom combined, count for 25 percent of the overall score. The remaining 75 percent is based equally on a submitted technical design paper that highlights the planning, development, testing and construction of the team’s canoe; a formal oral presentation, in which the team has to detail their canoe’s design, construction, racing ability and other innovative features, as well as defend their choices to the judges during a question and answer session; and the end product-the final racing canoe and project display, which is scored on aesthetics and visual presentation. 

Tiffany Hearn, 22, the senior engineering student and captain of the UNLV canoe-building team, haunchos the seven-member team of other UNLV engineering students that are trying to field a winning canoe. 

Engineering students at UNLV and all over the country do this every year. They enter local and regional competitions. A national champion is declared.  Last year the University of Nevada, Reno won.  

UNLV has never made it past the regional competition.  Last year they came in 11th place, their best finish yet. Maybe a win is in their cards this year. Maybe it isn’t.  That’s not the point. 

“This is a big project that takes months to complete. They have to be able to work as a team,” said Bill Culbreth, an associate dean in UNLV’s college of engineering. “Most engineering projects will work that way.” 

So it is that the national concrete canoe competition is more than a boat-building contest. It’s a metaphor for the real world — where there is not nor will there ever be a market for boats made of sand, glue and water. 

Noe Santos, 21, the team member most responsible for figuring out how to make this particular blend of concrete, doesn’t even plan on working in that area after he graduates in May. He’ll be doing research on solar cells. 

In the meantime, he and the rest of the UNLV team have spent at least 40 hours every week since May working on this canoe. “No Christmas vacation. No Valentine’s. No anything,” Hearn said. 

Santos further explained that you can’t use just any old concrete – and, no, they didn’t use our scrap casino concrete – to make a canoe that actually works. The competition’s rules say the canoe must float back to the surface after being submerged. UNLV has never done well on that test. 

The secret to the team’s confidence this year is the concrete concoction, which weighs in at 54 pounds per cubic foot, about 8 pounds lighter than water. 

The concrete, lined with a carbon fiber reinforcing mesh and with tiny metal cables, is then blended with tiny glass bubbles and hollow glass beads about the size of ice cream sprinkles so the concrete has little air pockets inside. 

In the past, UNLV’s teams have blended the concrete with rocks. They’ve had hits and misses, a couple of times suffering competition-ending catastrophic failures; the boats broke in half. 

But not this year, the team members say. 

The team took their boat out to a man-made lake at Desert Shores on March 14. They rowed in it. They sank it.  But the good news it that it came right back up. 

To work on their speed, team members have been practicing twice a week in a traditional fiberglass canoe. They’re getting pretty fast. 

Las Vegas Backstage Access hopes the UNLV team is just fast enough- taking home their first win!

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